First Clinton vs Trump’s Presidential Debate

by Patrick Liew on September 28, 2016

A key takeaway for Singapore from the first presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is that we should prevent our electorate from suffering the downsides of an election campaign and its unintended consequences.

We have to continue to educate our voters to ensure that they are politically-matured enough to be objective, rational, balanced and pragmatic.

Thus, they’ll not use their votes as an instrument to express their unhappiness and anger from some personal experiences with a candidate or a political party.

To vote wisely, they should be able to conduct due research, think critically, and make better-informed judgements.

They will not be unwittingly sold on appealing lies, half-truths, and misconceptions or be moved by well- packaged promises, propaganda and persuasive pitches.

In many developed countries, politicians use sophisticated publicity machinery to help them tug at heart strings for the purpose of winning votes.

As every vote can potentially change the fate of our country, voters should study the character of political candidates.

These candidates may be opportunists who will not hesitate to offer socio-economic benefits in exchange for political currency, compromising long-term growth for short-term gains, especially if the electorate is less inclined to take bitter medicine to achieve positive improvements.

Adequate resources should be deployed to find out material information such as ineffective manifestos and even hidden agendas and undue influences from local or overseas’ lobbyists.

When a proposal is put forth, voters should question its epistemological basis and ensure that a candidate’s proposal is based on evidence and not on assertion.

The proposal should be focused on serving the best interests of the community and country on a sustainable basis.

Voters need to ask themselves, “How do I know a point of view is fair and true?” More importantly, “How do I know that I know that it’s fair and true?”

As a perfect policy does not exist, with every policy accompanied by trade-offs and downsides, voters should not just buy into the benefits of a proposal without considering its risks and liabilities. They should also evaluate if the proposal is realistic and practical at this stage in the nation-building process.

In the final analysis, political leaders do not have a monopoly on good ideas, vision, roadmaps, and actions.
Therefore, the government should further improve the infrastructure, systems and processes to encourage growth of more civic-minded citizens and groups. There should be more ground-up and peer-to-peer initiatives to help political leaders lead the country, provide healthy checks and balances, and develop value-added propositions.

When we have more comprehensive and deeper involvement from different quarters of society, it’ll strengthen active citizenry and a collective sense of belonging, loyalty, and affection for our nation.

Go4It!

I hope this message will find a place in your heart.

By the way, I have also recorded other reflections.

Please ‘Like’ me on https://m.facebook.com/patrickliewsg

Visit my Inspiration blog at http://liewinspiration.wordpress.com/

For my opinions on social affairs, please visit my Transformation blog at http://hsrpatrickliew.wordpress.com/

Please visit my website, http://www.patrickliew.net

Let’s connect on instagram.com/patrickliewsg
– via @patrickliewsg

https: //twitter.com/patrickliew77
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My LinkedIn

http://www.linkedin.com/in/liewpatrick

Please read my reflections and continue to teach me.

Life is FUNtastic!

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International Day Of Peace

by Patrick Liew on September 21, 2016

Peace starts with the heart. The heart of any problem is very often a problem of the heart.

Your heart will shape and determine outcomes of a conflict. Desires of your heart will also influence strength of your relationships.

If your heart is not in the right place in bridging and bonding with others, there will never be an amicable relationship and peaceful resolution.

To have peace, there must be a desire for peace and being a peace-maker. Without such a commitment, there will be lesser peace in and around your life.

The challenge for most people is managing their ego. The ego is in essence an over-consciousness of your being and an unhealthy attachment to it.

It has a tendency to make you think and feel that you are bigger and better than who you really are and better than the others around you.

The ego needs to be fed but it will never be satisfied. In fact, if it is not effectively managed, it will become hungrier and will grow until it becomes bigger than you.

Gradually, an uncontrolled ego may devour you.

That’s why, it’s so important to have a proper perspective of people and the world around you.

If you hold on to an ethnocentric perspective and insist that you are always right, you can never resolve any challenge and build a closer relationship with others.

When you are willing to give up your need to be approved, to criticize, to control, and to insist that others must go your way, you can find peace within yourself and with others.

Breakthroughs in conflict resolution very often happen when you dare to say you have been wrong before and you can be wrong again. There are always better ways to achieve better results and you must be open to adopt them.

The better ways are sometimes brought up and directed by others.

Therefore, do not just expect others to understand us. Seek to understand them first. Stretch out your hands and build better bridges and stronger bondings with them.

As you look after their needs, they will also be more willing to look after your needs.

When you learn to be others-centric and not me-centric, you can build better friendships and communities.

The opposite is also true – when you seek to serve only your selfish interests, the other party will also ring-fence themselves and pursue their own interests. There will be more unhappiness, disappointment, and resentment.

In whatever situation you are in, don’t lose your cool. It will affect your reasoning and mindset.

Focus on principle not not on personality, the subject matter and not subject each other to any form of negativity.

As fellow members of the human race, don’t attack or seek to harm one other. Avoid taking things personally and calling each other names.

Attack the sin but not the sinner, after all none of us are perfect. Our views are evolving and can be changed instantly.

Therefore, be gracious to allow others to change and improve themselves and their position.

Do not partake in lies, half-truths, and misinformation. Seek to achieve outcomes that are positive, rational, and beneficial.

Start and continue every discussion and debate on the right path.

Be mindful about saying words or taking actions that will cause you to regret at a later stage. Remember, you may not even be able to correct them and set things right for the rest of your life.

During a conflict, if you throw mud at one another, both of you will become muddy.

Worst, if you spew poison in response to the other party’s poison, in the end, both of you will die of poison. Even if the other party stays neutral, you may eventually die emotionally from your own poison.

In the final analysis, even if you cannot prevent every conflict, you can have a more loving heart and a more magnanimous spirit.

At the same time, you can continue to learn, improve and become more effective in resolving conflicts and challenges.

Life is already too short for enjoying love, joy and peace. Why waste more time on unhealthy conflicts?

Why not pursue peace and help bring about a more peaceful world?

Let us do our part to unite people and bring forth more happiness and harmony to the people around us.

Together, let us step up – not shut down; love – not hate; forgive – not begrudge; heal – not harm; unite – not divide; progress – not regress; and be constructive – not destructive.

Let’s leave the world a better place than when we first step into it. If necessary, we can compromise short term personal gains for long term benefits for ourselves and for others too.

Peace is priceless. It begins with each and every one of us.

Let’s promote peace and be peace makers.

Go4It!

I hope this message will find a place in your heart.

By the way, I have also recorded other reflections.

Please ‘Like’ me on https://m.facebook.com/patrickliewsg

Visit my Inspiration blog at http://liewinspiration.wordpress.com/

For my opinions on social affairs, please visit my Transformation blog at http://hsrpatrickliew.wordpress.com/

Please visit my website, http://www.patrickliew.net

Let’s connect on instagram.com/patrickliewsg
– via @patrickliewsg

https: //twitter.com/patrickliew77
– via @patrickliew77

My LinkedIn

http://www.linkedin.com/in/liewpatrick

Please read my reflections and continue to teach me.

Life is FUNtastic!

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Effective Leadership

September 21, 2016

All great organisations depend on great leaders and teamwork. Leadership is about the following 7 E’s: 1. Envisioning – Developing a worthwhile vision to make the world a better home; 2. Exemplifying – Showing the way with the right behaviour; 3. Enrolling: Building a team of talents to fulfil the worthwhile vision; 4. Entrenching: Strengthening […]

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Building Trust

September 21, 2016

Building of trust starts from within the company. Research shows that trustworthiness of a company depends on attributes of its employees, including their ability, integrity and benevolence. In addition, a study conducted by University of Pennsylvania shows that when employees are grateful, it increases trust while anger decreases it. In other words, the quality of […]

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Passion

September 21, 2016

What drives champions? Passion. Passion is the essence of life. Passion is the starting point to living a life of purpose, significance and fulfilment. It is the generator that powers us with energy, vitality and dynamism on the journey of life. Passion can turn the impossible into possible. It can move us to achieve our […]

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Improve Your Financial literacy – Now!

September 19, 2016

Despite initiatives by the government to promote financial education, only 0.15 percent of the respondents could recall attending a MoneySENSE financial literacy education program (Monetary Authority of Singapore, 2005). The National Financial Literacy Survey 2005 indicates that many Singaporeans and especially those from the lower socioeconomic segment may not have the required mindset, knowledge and […]

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Capitalising On Disruptions

September 19, 2016

Disruption by definition of the word indicates that it’s an unexpected development that can have an impact on current and future operations. http://www.straitstimes.com/business/economy/tech-or-terrorism-govts-must-be-ready-for-disruptions-tharman While we cannot predict and stop disruptions, we should also not resign ourselves to apathy, complacency and passiveness. We can foster the right conditions to pioneer, respond to, and leverage on disruptions […]

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A Falling Leaf Returns To Its Roots (落叶归根)

September 19, 2016

As a result of societal unrest and prolonged famine, Mr Liew Fei Ru (刘辉如, 广东省, 梅州人), my grandfather left his beloved family and home in Gongzhou (公州) village in Dapu (大埔), Meizhou (梅州), Guangdong (广東) in 1903. He took a long drive to the port in Guangdong and set sail to seek for a better […]

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I Finally “Found” My Grandfather.

September 19, 2016

On 12 September 2016, I had a good chat with my older cousins. Through the conversations, I was able to piece together the life story of Mr Liew Fei Ru (刘辉如, 广东省, 梅州人), my grandfather who passed away years before I was born. My grandfather was born in Gongzhou (公州) village in Dapu (大埔), Meizhou […]

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A Trip To the Past (寻根記)

September 19, 2016

My family and I went on a discovery trip from 12 to 13 September 2016. Besides my family, there were five other related families that went on the trip. We wanted to visit the old house of Mr Liew FeiRu (刘斐如) who is my late grandfather. The old house is still standing and is located […]

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